Relationships between start-ups and incumbents

Background

Start-ups never spawn in isolation. This is particularly true for start-ups created by ex-employees ('spin-outs') and start-ups created by established organizations ('spin-offs') as the nature of the relationship - before, during, and after spawning - between parent-and child-firms can have important implications for all parties involved. However, also independent start-ups can substantially benefit (and suffer) from relationships to established companies.

Core themes

1. Why, when, and how does the nature of the parent-child-firm relationship affect the development of the child firm?

2. Why, when, and how does the nature of the parent-child-firm relationship affect the development of the parent firm?

3. Why, when, and how do connections to established firms affect the development of independent start-ups?

Exemplary publications

Walter, S. G., Walter, A., & Müller, D. (2015). Formalization, Communication Quality, and Opportunistic Behavior in R&D Alliances between Competitors. Journal of Product Innovation Management 32 (6), 954-970.

Walter, S. G., Heinrichs, S., & Walter, A. (2014). Parent Hostility and Spin-Out Performance. Strategic Management Journal, 35(13), 2031-2042.

PhD projects

Tietze, F. (2017-ongoing). Effects of Corporate Venture Capital Syndication.